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Goosebumps

Goosebumps is a Canadian horror fantasy anthology television series based on R. L. Stine’s best-selling Goosebumps book series. It opens with music from Jack Lenz.

As the eerie music plays we witness a man dressed in black carrying his briefcase up a hill. The name engraved on the briefcase reveals the mysterious man to be Goosebumps’ author, R. L. Stine (it really is author R.L. Stine in a cameo). A strong wind blows, opening Stine’s case, and his papers fly out, one of which turns into a “G” seen on the Goosebumps logo, only it was black shadow, and glides through an unnamed town. The “G” passes by a woman on a billboard, making her unhappy, and passes by a dog on a porch, which turns its eyes into cat eyes and glow a gold colour (this is referenced to in the episode “My Hairiest Adventure”). The “G” then creeps past a tree, down a sidewalk, and into the front door of a house and begins showing a quick montage of clips from several episodes with an announcer growling, “Viewer, beware, you’re in for a scare!”, remade from the tagline, “Reader, beware, you’re in for a scare!” used in the Goosebumps book series.

In season two, the opening was shortened, speeding up the Goosebumps “G” gliding through town and removing the quick episode montage in the doorway.

In season three, the show was renamed “Ultimate Goosebumps” and the opening underwent a few changes. A green slime and a lightning effect were added when the man in black walks up the hill with his briefcase and his papers fly out. However, instead of a paper turning into a G-shaped shadow and being blown through town, the man in black turns into bats which fly at the screen. The quick episode montage was added back but clips from different episodes were used. There are some episodes that don’t include the “Ultimate Goosebumps” name, so the short season two opening was used.

In season four, the show removed the “Ultimate” from its name but retained the season three opening sequence. In some markets, this opening was also used in reruns of the first two seasons.

The entire series is now available on Netflix.

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